Cindy Lin, Founder, Staged4more

Hi, Welcome to Our School of Home Staging!

After a successful, 12+ years run as a home staging company in San Francisco Bay Area, STAGED4MORE is now an online school that focuses on home staging education for home stagers, home sellers and real estate agents.

Please take some time and check out all the free resources and tips available on our blog & podcast, as well as our courses selections.

Let’s Talk About Home Staging Contracts

Let’s Talk About Home Staging Contracts

Blog Covers.png

A work agreement/contract is something that is not very sexy to discuss, but crucial to have in your business. I get asked a lot about how to make sure clients pay on time, what happens if this and that, etc. Ultimately, your contract should cover all these items so you are well-protected.

I want to preface this post by saying that I am not a lawyer; you should be getting legal advice specific to your situation from a lawyer. What I am sharing here comes from my personal experiences. It is up to you to double-check it with a lawyer. The regulations in each state are also different, so check with your local small business attorney when you have questions.

There are many sample contracts you can download from the internet, but you should still walk through it with a lawyer to tailor it to your business. Our business is our livelihood, so you want to make sure you are covered. In addition, we are working with large-ticket items here — a house is not a pair of socks from Target. Liability is much higher. So it is important to make sure you have a clear contract that protects your business.

I also see the contract as a communication tool with your clients. It outlines the scope of the work that you will perform, what your fee includes, and how you work (payment terms, professional policies, insurance, photography waivers, etc.) Think of your contract as a raincoat. There may be loopholes, and you may get wet, but it will protect you from most of the crap that’s going to rain on you.

Here are my top three tips to protect yourself with your contract:

1. MAKE SURE YOU GET A SIGNED CONTRACT BACK BEFORE THE WORK STARTS

I’ve been single for a long time, and I found that before the guy gets a date, you have all the power. It’s the same with client relationships. You have something the client wants: staging the property on time by a certain date. Before you stage the house, you have all the power. Once you staged the house, it will be impossible to get your contract signed, and you may spend most of your time chasing after that payment.

We learned this the hard way last year when we got crazy busy. Now, no jobs go on the work calendar unless and until we had received both a signed agreement and deposit payment. Our Project Coordinator is very firm about this.

No signature, no payment, no job. And we haven’t had issues since.

2. THE BEST CRISIS MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUE IS TO PREVENT THE CRISIS

In my years of business, I found that one of the best ways to resolve most issues is to be preventative. For example, even though we say in our contract that it is the client’s responsibility to notify us for destaging and that the client is responsible for prop rental until the day of removal, we still remind clients before they approach their deadline. We like to give our clients the benefit of the doubt.

Often, they may get too busy and simply forgot all about it. Selling a home tends to be a hectic time of life! By having a reminder — a 30-second email that you’ve copied and pasted from a template — may save you hours of going back and forth for what clients see as an unpleasant surprise. This is something we have set up in our project management program 17hats, and it helps to prevent any miscommunication.

3. CLIENTS’ PAYMENT IS LATE / NOT COMING / YOU ARE BEING GHOSTED BY THE CLIENT

While you resist the urge screaming at the client “F*ck you, pay me” Ray Liotta-Goodfellas-style, update your invoice and send them a professional email and either

  • Tack on the late fee, offer to remove it for prompt payment by a specific date.

  • Check in to see if there is a technical issue for submitting the payment (we only take credit cards) and offer to help before adding the late fees to the invoice.

Almost every time, the client has simply forgotten. However, if you run into issues with getting people to pay, make sure your contract covers details for all the scenarios possible. So when the worst case scenarios happen, you can protect yourself with the signed contract and all the documentation of client communication you have. Here are some examples of potential issues that you should address in your contract:

  • Inventory was damaged, missing, or stolen

  • Payment terms: before work starts, recurring billing, late payment, canceled check/bounced credit cards, your deposit policy (refundable or not, how much deposit before work starts), how you take payment

  • Terminating the work

  • Consent & waivers

  • Final invoices

  • What happens when there is a dispute

HOW ABOUT YOU? WHAT ARE SOME PARTS OF YOUR CONTRACT THAT YOU HAVE CONCERNS WITH? SHARE THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION!


Looking to start your own home staging business?

6-Figure-Floor-Plan.jpeg

Our 6-Figure Floor Plan is a complete course to build a profitable home staging business and take the kinks and guesswork out of building your business.

Whether you’re brand new to the business or have a few years under your belt, 6-Figure Floor Plan will push and challenge you to go to the next level.

Think of this course as a giant Q&A session. This course is designed to build and refine your business systems and strategies that take the kinks and guesswork out of creating a profitable, book solid home staging business.

Learn more here!

How to Hang Artwork in Awkward Spaces

How to Hang Artwork in Awkward Spaces

Home Staging Process with #30DayHomeStaging Challenger & Home Seller Kirstie Dempsey

Home Staging Process with #30DayHomeStaging Challenger & Home Seller Kirstie Dempsey